Contact Lens Related Dry Eye

Are Your Contact Lenses Causing Dry Eye?

Among the more frequent complaints, eye doctors receive from patients is that their contact lenses are making their eyes dry. While dry eye syndrome (DES) is very common among both contact lens wearers and non-wearers alike, the symptoms can be more severe and uncomfortable if you wear contact lenses. Typically, DES symptoms include irritated, red and itchy eyes.

The best way to deal with contact lens-induced dry eye syndrome is to visit us so we can determine exactly why your eyes are dry and provide ways to increase your comfort while wearing contact lenses.

What Is Contact Lens-Induced Dry Eye?

Dry Eye

The cornea, the front of your eye, is the only area of your body that receives oxygen directly from the air. One reason contact lens wearers are
predisposed to dry eyes is because the contact lens on your cornea can partially block oxygen from entering the eye. Although many contact lenses are designed to allow larger amounts of oxygen to permeate the eye, wearers can still experience dry, gritty eyes, especially towards the end of the day.

Another cause of contact lens-induced dry eye is the lenses’ absorption of tears. Lenses need liquid to stay soft and maintain their shape and
integrity.

This is known as contact lens-induced dry eye.

In a healthy eye, tears allow the contact lens to comfortably swim in the tear film above the cornea. A shortage of lacrimal fluid can lead to gaps
in the tear film, causing the contact lens to irritate the surface of the eye. That, in turn, causes pain, redness and itchiness.

This effect can be further exacerbated if the lenses are low in quality or are poorly fitted to the eye. Such contacts absorb too much liquid from the tear film, causing the eye to lose vital moisture. This can also occur when traditional soft lenses are worn for an extended period of time.

Getting Relief for Contact-Lens Induced Dry Eye

The following can provide relief from contact lens-related dry eye.

  • Eye drops - 
    • Be sure to get eye drops that can be applied safely with contact lenses to reduce discomfort and refresh eyes. If, for any reason, the over-the-counter eye drops aren’t working, consult Dr. Itzkow, who can provide more effective treatment options.
  • Eye vitamins - 
    • Certain vitamins, taken orally, can increase the amount of nutrients your eyes receive. This not only improves eye health,
      but also increases contact lens comfort. The best eye vitamins and supplements include lutein, zeaxanthin, Vitamin A, Vitamin C and Omega-3.
  • Silicone hydrogel contact lenses - 
    • These lenses are made from the most innovative contact lens material available on the market. They are
      extremely breathable because they permit up to 5 times more oxygen to reach the eye than older-generation contact lenses. This allows them to be worn over a long period of time. They reduce dryness and boost comfort.
  • Low water content contact lenses - 
    • It is a common misconception that the higher the water content, the more comfortable the contact lens. For certain wearers, particularly those suffering from dry eyes, it can have the inverse effect. High water contact lenses allow more oxygen to flow to the cornea but over time, as they lose liquid, they draw it from the tear film, thus exacerbating dry eye symptoms.
  • Daily disposable contact lenses - 
    • Also called dailies, these single-day contact lenses are a great option for dry eye sufferers. This is because protein deposits don’t have the time to build-up and cause discomfort, and lenses don’t dry out as a result of improper cleaning
      routines.
  • Scleral lenses -
    • These large-diameter rigid gas permeable (GP) lenses vault over the entire corneal surface, ensuring that the front surface of the eyes don’t dry out. The liquid reservoir between the lenses and the cornea provides a continuous moist environment that protects the cornea and provides relief for those with dry eyes.
  • Orthokeratology -
    • Would you like to wear contact lenses only when asleep? Orthokeratology (or ortho-k) is a gas permeable contact lens prescribed for overnight wear only. These lenses reshape the cornea while you sleep and temporarily correct nearsightedness and other refractive
      errors, thus enabling you to see clearly during the day without any need for contacts or glasses. This reduces contact lens-related dry eye symptoms.
  • Adhering to the hygiene routine advised by your eye doctor - 
    • Those who wear monthly lenses need to adhere to a specific hygiene routine advised by their eye doctor. If you’re using the wrong solution or not cleaning your lenses properly, this could be why you’re suffering from dry eye. Keep in mind that not all multi-purpose cleaning solutions are designed to clean silicone hydrogel contact lenses, so make sure the solution you’re using is correct.


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